elderly lady with type 1 diabetes

Managing Type 1 Diabetes In Older People

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Find out about how type 1 diabetes can be successfully managed to ensure that a person has the quality of life they deserve.

There are around 400,000 people with type 1 diabetes in the UK. Type 1 diabetes is much rarer than type 2 diabetes and type 1 is usually diagnosed in childhood. For that reason, a person with type 1 diabetes who is elderly is likely to have dealt with the condition for a long time. However, there may be an additional need for support to manage the condition well alongside the challenges of ageing. Left untreated, diabetes can lead to heart problems, strokes, oral health issues, nerve problems and problems with sight.

It is very important to provide the right care and support to an elderly person with type 1 diabetes to ensure that the condition is effectively managed. With the right care, a person with this condition can have a healthy, happy life. Whilst life expectancy has always been shorter for those with diabetes (both men and women) by up to 10 years or more, improvement in diabetes care in recent decades shows life expectancy has increased for people with type 1 diabetes.

Live-in Care For Type 1 Diabetes

Live-in care is a great idea for those who live at home with the condition, who may require additional support to help manage day-to-day. Family members may be able to provide some level of care, but it can be quite overwhelming when it comes to diabetes care when a person is not trained and may, themselves be getting older. Live-in carers are specially trained to support both the client and their family in the management of the condition. A tailor-made support plan can be established to ensure that the preferences and needs of the client are met, helping them to manage their routine successfully, for quality of life.

All Aspects Of Care Taken Care Of

When diabetes support is provided by a live-in carer, they provide assistance round the clock. This help is far-reaching and relates to all aspects of their client’s life, from personal care to household tasks. As well as helping manage the medication routine, a carer can prepare healthy meals, support and encourage exercise, and help keep an eye out for early signs of symptoms that could get worse without medical help.

, they provide assistance round the clock. This help is far-reaching and relates to all aspects of their client’s life, from personal care to household tasks. As well as helping manage the medication routine, a carer can prepare healthy meals, support and encourage exercise, and help keep an eye out for early signs of symptoms that could get worse without medical help.

In all instances, a live-in carer will use their experience to try and help a person improve their lifestyle so that they have an even better quality of life. They may suggest mobility aids, an improved diet, exercise types that suit the person’s physical abilities and even home adjustments that could help.

In addition, companionship is a huge part of live-in care, where all the physical needs of a person are met, but the emotional needs are not sidelined, as they sometimes can be in stretched-for-time residential care facilities.

If you’re interested in arranging live-in care for yourself or your loved one, to help manage type 1 diabetes why not read our latest report about the benefits.

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